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Other Ways to Give

The Therapeutic Parents'
and Children's Center

In response to the needs of young children who have been abused or neglected, or who have witnessed domestic violence, Family Resources operates the Therapeutic Parents' and Children's Center (TPCC). Accredited by the National Association for the Education of Young Children, TPCC works with children ages 3 to 5 who exhibit developmental delays or emotional disturbances.

These children may present a variety of other symptoms, including attachment disorders, anxiety, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, dissociation, hyperactivity, and conduct disorders.

TPCC encourages each child to develop play and social skills, self-esteem, and trust. Our preschool setting and parent/caregiver services improve child and family functioning and prepare children for neighborhood schools.

We seek to prevent further abuse and neglect by educating and supporting parents and caregivers. We offer them training in safe parenting and in overcoming developmental delays related to abuse or neglect.

How TPCC works
The school is open Tuesday through Friday, and classes run from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Children can enroll at any time during the year. We serve meals for all children under the Child and Adult Care Food Program. Parents and caregivers participate in a variety of activities, including home visits, monthly family nights or field trips, interagency meetings, and classroom involvement.

Eligibility and conditions
TPCC is for children between the ages of 3 and 5 who have experienced abuse or have come from a family where child physical, sexual, or emotional abuse, serious neglect, or domestic violence has occurred. To attend TPCC, the child must have developmental delays or behavior problems that would make it difficult to succeed in a less restrictive setting such as Head Start or a private preschool. The parent or caregiver must be participating in services offered by Family Resources or another agency. If another agency provides these services, the parent or caregiver must sign a release of information form to continue treatment at the other agency. Parents or caregivers are responsible for the child's transportation.

Overview

Accredited by the National Association for the Education of Young Children, TPCC works with young children who exhibit developmental delays or emotional disturbances.

TPCC encourages each child to develop play and social skills, self-esteem, and trust.

Our preschool setting and parent/caregiver services improve child and family functioning and prepare children for neighborhood schools.


Contact

For more information about TPCC, call:

Rianna Raraigh

412 363 1702 ext 1402


Therapy dogs help kids feel safe.

Therapy dogs are regular visitors to the Therapeutic Parents' and Children's Center at Family Resources.

Read The Story More stories from the Courage Wall visit the wall

Facts at a Glance

  • For children between the ages of 3 and 5 who have experienced abuse or come from a family where abuse or violence has occurred
  • Classes Tuesday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
  • Children may enroll throughout the year

A Therapy Dog's story

Did you know that therapy dogs are regular visitors to the Therapeutic Parents' and Children's Center (TPCC) at Family Resources?

The children learn that the dogs, like themselves, were with families that could not care for them and that the dogs – like the children – needed new homes where they could feel safe and loved. The "lessons" help reinforce what the children are learning: animals, like children, need love, food, shelter, and someone to keep them safe. Dana, Veronica, and the other TPCC staff talk with the children about how to keep a dog safe – in the house and out-of-doors (in many ways, the rules for keeping a pet safe are the same as those for children) – as well as how to treat a dog respectfully, how to approach an unfamiliar dog, and what to do if an unfamiliar dog comes close and there is no adult around.

Some children start the year with a fear of dogs that is calmed as the visits progress. Sometimes the dog's presence helps the teachers gain a deeper understanding of the child. A three-year old who had been at the TPCC for more than a month was very reluctant to interact with the other children and the teachers, and barely spoke. He had been severely abused and was being cared for by his grandparents. One day, playing in the sand box with the therapy dog nearby, he suddenly said to the teacher, "My dog's dead." The teacher asked what had happened. The boy said, "My dad got mad and shot him." The child had witnessed his dog dying and, because of the therapy dog, was now able to open himself up a little and let another adult in, and begin to heal…